Can Retirement Result in a Shorter Life?

The American dream can vary from person to person, but generally has a few things in common. Namely, a successful and rewarding career, a loving partner, 2 or 3 children, a house, and a healthy amount of money in the bank for retirement. Ever since the advent of social security, 65 has been seen as the customary year of retirement. In fact, some people were automatically let go upon reaching that age. However, the choice of 65 as a career stopping point happened so many decades ago, the human lifespan has expanded in the interim, thanks to medical science. So is 65 really the year you should retire?

More and more, medical science is emphasizing the importance of staying active. While some people live rich and full lives during their retirement years, a significant number of people do not know what to do with themselves. They disengage from the world and sit in front of the television or computer. Although it is customary for our activity level to decrease in our golden years, it should never go down to almost nothing. For the good of your physical and mental health, you need to be doing things.

No one is saying that retirement is necessarily a death sentence, but seeing how people are living longer, they need to realize that exercise remains important. It helps to keep our systems working the way they should as well as helping to keep weight down. Excess weight can cause any number of health problems, including diabetes and heart disease.

Your brain also needs to be active. Research is starting to show that if the mind remains engaged, performs tasks that require notable brain function, and generally remains engaged in life, individuals are less likely to develop conditions like dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Retirement should not equal wrapping yourself up in a cocoon. If anything, this is the time of life when you should be getting out there and doing your thing.

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