The Newbie’s Guide to Buying a Motorbike

If you’re ready to start riding, getting a motorbike is much like getting a car, but there are a few things you should take into account that has to do with safety, and you should obviously take them seriously.

yamaha motorbike

The Paperwork and Your Safety

The first step is to get a provisional license and take CBT (compulsory basic training), which you can do at one of many licensed a href=”http://www.begin-motorcycling.co.uk/centres.htm”>training centres around the country. All the elements of the course, including riding safety theory and time on the road, can be completed in about 8 hours overall but will likely take several days.

Finishing the course comes with a certificate of completion. With the certificate and the provisional license, you can purchase or hire a learner motorcycle up to 125cc with a maximum output of 14.6bhp. You’ll need to insure it, after which you can ride it with L plates. You have two years to take and pass the theory and practice tests in order to get your full motorbike license, with which you can buy whatever kind of bike you desire. But take the time to ride your learner, to get comfortable on the roads and understand the type of riding you want to do – which will determine the kind of motorbike you ultimately purchase.

The Bike

Determine the type of riding you want to do. Diehard riders often end up owning more than one type of bike. If you plan to use it for commuting, consider a traditional bike, which lets you ride in a more relaxed posture than a sport bike, but not as relaxed as a cruiser. If you want to use it for long-haul trips, look at the touring bikes, they are much more comfortable.

New bikes start much cheaper than new cars, and the purchase is much similar. But you should consider purchasing a used bike – you find lots of them on MotorcycleNews.com. Motorbikes are much easier to maintain than cars, and working on at least some aspects yourself will give you a better understanding of the bike and make you into a better rider. Furthermore, if this is your first bike, you may realise that the type you thought was perfect for you is not in fact what is practicable or enjoyable. Finally – and you will hear this enough during your training – every bike eventually ends up falling down. Every one. So there’s no reason to ruin an expensive new toy while you’re learning.

Finally, don’t forget protective gear. In addition to the helmet, you should get a jacket, gloves, boots and a rain suit. This is not a good area for savings – get the best you can afford, because that piece of leather and/or metal will be the only thing between a moving you and the asphalt if you do go down.

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